Sabah Rhino (Dicerorhinus_sumatrensis harrisoni) Autor: Jastram/IZW
Sabah Rhino (Dicerorhinus_sumatrensis harrisoni) Autor: Jastram/IZW

Vaccination stops tumor growth in rhinoceros

Female rhinoceros often suffer from vaginal or uterus tumors, which complicate the production of offspring. For the first time, scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) in Berlin and the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna succeeded in stopping the growth and regeneration of innocuous tumors via vaccination. The A shot against cancer - treatment was successfully conducted in southern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum) and greater one-horned rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis). Injecting the serum “Improvac“ influences the release of sexual hormones, which causes the female oestrous cycle to cease and thereby reduces hormone-dependent tumors. These results have been published in the scientific open access journal PLOS ONE...

 

 

Head of a tapeworm Taenia sp. Picture: I. Lesniak/Leibniz-IZW
Head of a tapeworm Taenia sp. Picture: I. Lesniak/Leibniz-IZW

A wolf’s stowaways

Since the year 2000, the Eurasian grey wolf, Canis lupus lupus, has spread across Germany. For Ines Lesniak, doctoral student at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), and her colleagues, a good reason to have a closer look at the small “occupants” of this returnee and to ask the question whether the number and species of parasites change with an increasing wolf population. This was the case, because the number of parasite species per individual wolf increased as the wolf population expanded. Furthermore, cubs had a higher diversity of parasite species than older animals. The good news: wolf parasites do not pose a threat to human health. The results of this study were published in the scientific online journal “Scientific Reports” of the Nature Publishing Group ...

 

 

Leibniz-IZW| Photo: Asian golden cat. (C) WWF-Malaysia/Azlan Mohamed
Leibniz-IZW| Photo: Asian golden cat. (C) WWF-Malaysia/Azlan Mohamed

Closely related yet so different - two felid cousins responded in the past very differently to climate change

Southeast Asia is home to numerous felids, including the Asian golden cat and the bay cat. The two cat species are closely related sister species which split from each other 3.16 million years ago. Yet, their more recent history was quite different ...

 

 

Leibniz-IZW| Foto: Schneeberger K
Leibniz-IZW| Foto: Schneeberger K

Date-licious smell for bats

Females of the greater sac-winged bat select their mating partner by smell and unerringly choose a male which differs from them the most in genetic terms. Females with more variants of olfactory receptors of the TAAR-group have an advantage over other females. The results of this study have been released by the Nature Publishing Group in their open access journal “Scientific Reports“...

Leibniz-IZW| Foto: Weyrich A
Leibniz-IZW| Foto: Weyrich A

"Epigenetics - bridge between genome and environment", a science comic by the Leibniz-IZW

he Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) has translated the results of its research into a comic. It tells a story about wild guinea pigs and teaches us that genes are not everything: environmental conditions and individual experiences can influence which sections of the genetic code are used. The Leibniz-IZW-comic "Epigenetics - bridge between genome and environment" ...

Leibniz-IZW| Foto: Steven Seet
Leibniz-IZW| Foto: Steven Seet

Leibniz-IZW receives grant of the Philipp Schwartz Initiative

The Berlin Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) support researchers from dangerous regions of the world. Now, the Philipp Schwartz Initiative provided the Leibniz-IZW with an opportunity to award a two years fellowship to a researcher from Syria ...

Carnivores in the Serengeti infected with CDV. Top left: bat-eared fox. Top right: African wild dog. Bottom left: spotted hyena. Bottom right:  African lion.
Carnivores in the Serengeti infected with CDV. Top left: bat-eared fox. Top right: African wild dog. Bottom left: spotted hyena. Bottom right: African lion.

A rare combination of genetic changes increases the virulence of canine distemper virus (CDV) and explains how CDV killed lions and spotted hyenas in the Serengeti

The long-running debate about why just one of several canine distemper virus (CDV) outbreaks in the Serengeti in Tanzania during the past 25 years was fatal for lions and spotted hyenas has been resolved. An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW), conducted genetic analyses of CDV strains obtained from a range of carnivores between 1993 and 2012 and discovered that lethal CDV infections in lions and hyenas during the 1993/1994 epidemic was caused by a rare and genetically distinct CDV strain with three rare mutations not present in any other Serengeti strain isolated from domestic dogs or wild canids. Two of these rare mutations were found to increase the ability of CDV to invade lion cells ...

Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse on the Beato de Fernando I y doña Sancha dated 1047 AD (Apoc. VI, 1–8f. 135; shelf 14-2 National Library, Madrid;  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:B_Facundus_135.jpg
Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse on the Beato de Fernando I y doña Sancha dated 1047 AD (Apoc. VI, 1–8f. 135; shelf 14-2 National Library, Madrid; https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:B_Facundus_135.jpg

The Emperor's New Coats – the history of horse coat colours

Human preferences for horse coat colours have changed greatly over time and across cultures. Spotted and diluted horses were more frequent from the beginning of domestication until the end of the Roman Empire, whereas solid colours (bay, black and chestnut) were predominant in the Middle Ages. These are the findings of an international research team under the direction of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW). The results have just been published in the open access journal “Scientific Reports” ...

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Welcome to the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research!

Willkommen am Leibniz-Institut für Zoo- und Wildtierforschung (IZW)! Deutsche Version der IZW-Webseite.

The Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) is an interdisciplinary research institute dedicated to developing the scientific basis for novel approaches to wildlife conservation.

In the current era of the Anthropocene, virtually all ecosystems in the world are subjected to man-made impacts. As yet, it is not possible to predict the response of wildlife to the ever-increasing global change. Why are some wildlife species threatened by anthropogenic change, while others persist or even thrive in modified, degenerated or novel habitats?

To answer this and related questions, the IZW conducts basic and applied research across different scientific disciplines. We study the diversity of life histories and evolutionary adaptations and their limits, including diseases, of free-ranging and captive wildlife species, and their interactions with people and their environment in Germany, Europe and worldwide.

The IZW is a member of the Leibniz Association and the Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.