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The Leibniz-IZW is an internationally renowned German research institute. It is part of the Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. and a member of the Leibniz Association. Our goal is to understand the adaptability of wildlife in the context of global change and to contribute to the enhancement of the survival of viable wildlife populations. For this purpose, we investigate the diversity of life histories, the mechanisms of evolutionary adaptations and their limits, including diseases, as well as the interrelations of wildlife with their environment and people. We use expertise from biology and veterinary medicine in an interdisciplinary approach to conduct fundamental and applied research – from the molecular to the landscape level – in close dialogue with the public and stakeholders. Additionally, we are committed to unique and high-quality services for the scientific community.

+++ Current information on African swine fever: The Leibniz-IZW conducts research on the population dynamics, on models of disease outbreaks in wild boars and on the ecology and human-wildlife interaction in urban areas. African swine fever is a reportable disease in domestic swine and therefor is the purview of the respective federal state laboratories and the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (Federal Research Institute for Animal Health) FLI. +++

News

 

Freshly isolated African lion oocytes, Foto: J. Zahmel
Freshly isolated African lion oocytes, Foto: J. Zahmel

Scientists produce the first in-vitro embryos from vitrified African lion oocytes

A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) inGermany, Givskud Zoo - Zootopia in Denmark and the University of Milan in Italy succeeded in producing the very first African lion in-vitro embryos after the vitrification of immature oocytes. For this specific method of cryopreservation, oocytes are collected directly after an animal is castrated or deceased and immediately frozen at -196°C in liquid nitrogen. This technique allows the storage of oocytes of valuable animals for an unlimited time, so that they can be used to produce offspring with the help of assisted reproduction techniques. The aim is to further improve and apply these methods to save highly endangered species such as the Asiatic lion from extinction. The current research on African lions as a model species is an important step in this direction. The results are reported in the scientific journal “Cryobiology”.

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Hedgehog monitoring in a Berlin park (Photo: Anne Berger)
Hedgehog monitoring in a Berlin park (Photo: Anne Berger)

Recent hedgehog conservation research fills important research gaps on hedgehogs in the Anthropocene

Hedgehogs live both in the countryside and larger cities. As populations continue to decline, especially in rural areas, most hedgehogs in central Europe are now urban dwellers. To efficiently protect these populations, the suitability of their traits and life histories for life in human-dominated habitats need to be better understood. The new special issue on "applied hedgehog conservation research" of the scientific journal "Animals", co-edited by Dr Anne Berger of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), fills an important part of this research gap. One of the new research results published in the special issue: Hedgehogs are not very mobile, yet despite considerable barriers in the cityscape, such as roads or waterways, they do not become isolated from each other and still function as one population. This was indicated by sufficient gene flow and a lack of genetic population structure of the hedgehogs in Berlin. The authors conclude that both green spaces and corridors in the city on the one hand and translocations by hedgehog carers on the other are key to the gene flow and thus to the resilience of local hedgehog populations.

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The BioRescue team during the oocyte collection in December 2020 (Photo: Rio the photographer)
The BioRescue team during the oocyte collection in December 2020 (Photo: Rio the photographer)

Happy end to a challenging year: Two new northern white rhino embryos created at Christmas – now there are five

The international consortium of scientists and conservationists that is working towards preventing the extinction of the northern white rhino through advanced assisted reproduction technologies is happy to announce that in December 2020, two new northern white rhino embryos were produced. On December 13, the team of Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), Safari Park Dvůr Králové, Kenya Wildlife Service and Ol Pejeta Conservancy successfully performed an oocyte collection in Kenya. After immediate transportation of the recovered oocytes across continents, the embryos were created at Avantea laboratory in Cremona (Italy) following maturation and fertilisation of the oocytes with the semen of Suni. They were cryopreserved on Christmas eve when they reached the blastocyst stage suitable for freezing and increase the total number of viable embryos produced so far to five. This nourishes the hope that despite challenges and delays caused by COVID-19 the northern white rhino can still be saved. The next steps in the programme are already underway. 

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Group of hyenas during a border conflict, Foto: Oliver Höner/Leibniz-IZW
Group of hyenas during a border conflict, Foto: Oliver Höner/Leibniz-IZW

High-ranking male hyenas have better chances with females because they are less “stressed” than low-ranking males

Scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) have found that interacting with other males is more “stressful” for low-ranking than for high-ranking male spotted hyenas. This restricts the time and energy low-ranking males can invest in courting the most desirable females and is therefore a key factor for their lower reproductive success than their high-ranking rivals. This mechanism seems to be more important in determining the number and quality of offspring than physical traits such as attractiveness and fighting ability. These insights were possible owing to a combination of extensive field and lab work – over 20 years of searching and identifying thousands of hyenas in the Ngorongoro Crater in Northern Tanzania, monitoring their behaviour and life histories, and measuring the concentration of glucocorticoid metabolites in more than 400 faeces. The findings are published in the scientific journal “Functional Ecology”.

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Orang-Utang, Foto: Rhino and Forest Fund e.V.
Orang-Utang, Foto: Rhino and Forest Fund e.V.

Clear path for wildlife: Another milestone reached for wildlife corridor in Borneo by converting oil palm plantations into rainforest

One year ago, the Rhino and Forest Fund (RFF) – a spin-off of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) – and the Borneo Orangutan Survival (BOS) Deutschland e.V. launched a collaboration to convert oil palm plantations into new rainforest in Malaysian Borneo. These new rainforest sites will serve as a wildlife corridor between two protected areas that are currently separated by plantations impassable to many wildlife species: Tabin and Kulamba Wildlife Reserves. Within three years, the RFF and other partners have acquired 65 hectares of key areas (forest and plantation areas) with guidance from the Leibniz-IZW. The areas were transferred to the Sabah Forestry Department (SFD), which assigned them to the highest protection status. Since the collaboration of RFF and BOS started, approximately 8,000 new trees were planted and now grow to become valuable wildlife habitat.

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A cheetah in central Namibia (Photo: J.Zwilling/Leibniz-IZW)
A cheetah in central Namibia (Photo: J.Zwilling/Leibniz-IZW)

Scientists identify hotspots of cheetah activity as a key to solving the cheetah-farmer conflict in Namibia

Rural central Namibia is one of the most important strongholds of the declining global cheetah population. Here, the rarest large African cat lives on privately owned farmland. A traditional conflict poses a threat to them,as they occasionally prey on cattle calves and are therefore rarely welcomed on the farms. New insights into the cheetah’s spatial behaviour provide a viable solution to this human-wildlife conflict: In the core areas of male cheetah territories all local males and females frequently meet to exchange information. This results in hotspots of cheetah activity in these “communication hubs” and in substantially less activity in the vast areas between the core areas of the territories. Implementing this knowledge and moving their breeding herds with young calves out of these hotspots, farmers were able to reduce livestock losses by more than 80 percent. These insights are the result of a close and trusting cooperation between scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and farmers in central Namibia. They are published in the scientific journal “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America”.

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Dr. Kristin Mühldorfer has been recognised as de facto diplomate of the ECVM
Dr. Kristin Mühldorfer has been recognised as de facto diplomate of the ECVM

Leibniz-IZW receives approval as Satellite Training Centre of the European College of Veterinary Microbiology

The European Board of Veterinary Specialisation has recognised Dr Kristin Mühldorfer, microbiology specialist in the Leibniz-IZW Department of Wildlife Diseases, as a de facto diplomate of the European College of Veterinary Microbiology (ECVM). Simultaneously, the Leibniz-IZW received approval as a Satellite Training Centre to participate in the ECVM residency programme and to promote high quality training in the discipline of veterinary microbiology at the European level. Residents will benefit from the long hands-on and scientific experience of bacteriology and pathology in wildlife disease diagnostics, and gain insights into research activities of Mühldorfer and her colleagues.

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City bird with prey. Photo: Till Kottmann/Unsplash
City bird with prey. Photo: Till Kottmann/Unsplash

Abundance of prey species is key to bird diversity in cities

Urbanisation represents a drastic change to natural habitats and poses multiple challenges to many wildlife species, thereby affecting the occurrence and the abundance of many bird species. A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the Technische Universität Berlin (TUB) collaborated to analyse breeding bird data from the Senate of Berlin gathered by citizen scientists. They found that the abundance of invertebrates such as insects or spiders as prey is a key factor affecting bird diversity in the city. The more prey is available, the more diverse the urban bird communities are. This demonstrates the importance of species interactions for explaining urban biodiversity in addition to impacts of anthropogenic disturbance and habitat structure. The results are published in the scientific journal “Diversity and Distributions”.

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IZW in the media

BBC video on the Northern White Rhino Rescue reaches more than 1,3 million views on youtube and more than 9,5 million views on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2685812534841992).

 

12.01.2021 | arte
Wie gefährlich sind Zoonosen für den Menschen?

09.12.2020 | rbb Inforadio
Geparden in Namibia: "Ein Szeneclub wie in einer Großstadt"

29.11.2020 | U.S. News
'D-Day' for Pakistan's Lonely Elephant as Handlers Prepare Airlift to Cambodia

24.11.2020 | Süddeutsche Zeitung
Vogelgrippe-Alarm an der Küste

10.11.2020 | Deutschlandfunk Kultur, Kakadu
Hilfe für Fledermäuse. Was können wir für Fledermäuse tun?

01.11.2020 | Scientific American
 

02.09.2020 | The Independent
Covid deals a blow to saving critically endangered Northern White rhino

24.08.2020 | Radio1
Naturschutz: Fledermäuse suchen Winterquartiere

23.08.2020 | Volksstimme
Grottenolme: Hoffnung auf Nachwuchs

23.08.2020 | BILD am Sonntag
Neue Hoffnung für die letzten Nashörner | Wissenschaftler konnten Eizellen von Nördlichen Breitmaulnashörnern entnehmen

22.08.2020 | Radio1
Wildtoxikologie: Bleimunition tötet jährlich tausende Vögel

18.08.2020 | abcNEWS
More eggs harvested from last 2 northern white rhinos

18.08.2020 | SWIswissinfo
Scientists harvest more eggs from near-extinct northern white rhino

18.08.2020 | Tagesspiegel
Es begab sich aber zu der Zeit, da alle Eichhörnchen geschätzt werden sollten

15.08.2020 | rbb Fernsehen
rbb Wissenszeit: Fledermäuse - Heimliche Wanderer

12.08.2020 | Leibniz-Magazin
Grünes Dilemma - Abertausende Fledermäuse sterben jedes Jahr an deutschen Windrädern. Und zeigen: Wenn Klima- und Artenschutz in Konflikt geraten, wird es kompliziert.

10.08.2020 | Berliner Zeitung
Touristen stressen Seeadler

09.08.2020 | SkyNews
Scientists try to create first rhino test tube baby to save near-extinct species

17.07.2020 | Süddeutsche Zeitung
Antiheld aus der Grotte

16.07.2020 | Redaktionsnetzwerk Deutschland
Neue Pandemien durch Wildtiere? Experte warnt vor Umweltzerstörung

11.07.2020 | Spiegel Online
Tierkrankheiten beim Menschen - "Auch die nächste Pandemie wird uns kalt erwischen"

06.07.2020 | Mongabay
For two rhino species on brink of extinction, it’s collaboration vs. stonewalling

03.07.2020 | Spiegel Online
Clans im Matriarchat - Das wundersame Sozialverhalten der Tüpfelhyänen

30.06.2020 | Spiegel Online
Nashorn-Rettungsversuch: Sie sind die letzten ihrer Art

27.06.2020 | stern
Was tun, wenn es nur noch Weibchen gibt?

25.06.2020 | Süddeutsche Zeitung
Wegen Paarung mit Hund abgeschossene Wölfin nicht trächtig

25.06.2020 | Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Der Fuchs: Was den scheuen Räuber so faszinierend macht

22.06.2020 | Spektrum der Wissenschaft
Naturschutz: Wird bleihaltige Jagdmunition endlich verboten?

22.06.2020 | Berliner Zeitung
Forscher warnen vor Hexenjagd auf Fledermäuse wegen Corona

18.06.2020 | BILD
Rettung für die Nashörner, Serengeti Park bei Projekt dabei

17.06.2020 | ScienceDaily
Oocyte collection and embryo creation in southern white rhinos

17.06.2020 | Phys.Org
Researchers perform southern white rhino oocyte collection and embryo creation

16.06.2020 | RTL
Vom Aussterben bedroht: Serengeti-Park Hodenhagen hilft bei Rettung der Breitmaulnashörner

17.06.2020 | Stuttgarter Zeitung
Fledermäuse in den Fängen von Windrädern

16.06.2020 | la Repubblica
Rinoceronte bianco del nord, nuove speranze di salvarlo dall'estinzione

13.06.2020 | Radio1
Berliner Füchse verlassen die Stadt nicht

06.06.2020 | Radio1
Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften - Die Koexistenz von Mensch und Tier

06.06.2020 | Volksstimme
Grottenolme - Weltsensation aus Rübeland

05.06.2020 | Bayrischer Rundfunk
Rangordnung im Tierreich - Auf deinen Platz!

05.06.2020 | Berliner Zeitung
Berliner Füchse haben keine Lust auf Brandenburg

29.05.2020 | The Hindu
In the wake of unverified rumours linking bats to the novel coronavirus, bats have suddenly emerged as villains

25.05.2020 | Spektrum der Wissenschaft
Fledermaus-Angst: »Das ist eine regelrechte Hexenjagd«

23.05.2020 | Focus
Nashorn aus der Dose

15.05.2020 | Spektrum der Wissenschaft
Der Wolf hätte fast überall Platz

25.04.2020 | Süddeutsche Zeitung
Tiere: Forschung zur Rettung von Nashorn-Unterart "auf Eis"

20.04.2020 | New York Times
When Crocodiles Once Dived Like Dolphins and Whales

20.04.2020 | The Guardian
Ancient ocean-going crocodiles mimicked whales and dolphins

14.04.2020 | BBC
Northern white rhinos: The audacious plan that could save a species

14.04.2020 | La Repubblica
Kenya, un laboratorio italiano salverà il rinoceronte bianco

13.03.2020 | La Stampa
Le Wallaby della palude possono essere incinte tutta la vita

11.03.2020 | Fox News
This adorable animal spends its entire adult life pregnant

03.03.2020 | Süddeutsche Zeitung
Biologie: Wallaby-Kängurus können doppelt trächtig werden

02.03.2020 | The New York Times
This Mom Is Still Pregnant. But She’s Already Having Another Baby

02.03.2020 | Smithsonian Magazine
Swamp Wallabies Can Get Pregnant While Pregnant

02.03.2020 | National Geographic
This marsupial is the only animal that's always pregnant

21.02.2020 | ZDF
planet e.: Artenschutz extrem - Erhalt um jeden Preis?